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The Pros and Cons of Having a Career in Law  

If one is considering law as a profession, one must be well aware of what being a lawyer entails. The profession is known to have great benefits but one must ponder both the benefits and the challenges of becoming an attorney at law, one can simply ask Diego Ruiz Duran. Duran, a defense attorney, can shed much light on the everyday benefits and the everyday challenges of practicing law. Simply using and sharing one’s knowledge of the law must be rewarding all of it’s own especially when providing quality legal counsel. This profession not only involves giving great advice and counsel but an attorney, often actually called counselor, interprets laws and regulations for their clients be it for businesses or individuals. In addition, this profession requires preparing necessary papers and documents, collecting evidence, analyzing possible end results and presentations; not to mention, appearing in court before judges, utilizing logical reasoning all the while having to be persuasive as their abilities to be analytical are of the utmost importance. Now, one can see there is much required in this profession. Therefore, it is rightfully rewarded but as mentioned before, it has its challenges. Let’s look a little further at a few of the pros and cons of this rewarding career.

Pro’s

First, there is a variety of career options as one can be selective from a long list of possibilities such as being a criminal prosecutor, defense attorney, tax attorney, real estate attorney or even a corporate attorney among many more positions that one can be fulfilled and passionate about. In addition, one can actually choose if starting their own business or working for a law firm would be their chosen path for some of the positions mentioned.

Second, this particular profession can result in a very lucrative career. The knowledge and skills make for the ability to gross very generous earnings. In addition, one may find satisfaction and the use of their intellectual abilities to be just as rewarding and lucrative along with having flexible schedules to meet one’s personal needs such as working from home and having a quality work-life balance. From the actual money to the non monetary benefits, all make for a very lucrative career.

Third, many more than most consider the profession to be prestigious. The prestige stems from the impressive education that is needed to get the notable degrees, honors and certifications.

Con’s

First, high-stressful cases and situations come with this career. It is easy to have constant high level demands and endless deadlines. The emotional toll can be devastating for some.

Second, long hours go hand in hand with the stress. Even with a flexible schedule, there will be times when sleep will be considered a luxury. It is easy to do 60 to 90 hours weekly when very important cases are on the table.
Third, that impressive education can be very expensive monetarily and time wise. Although typically worth it, it usually takes time to pay the debt of that education. Overall, Diego Ruiz Duran enjoys his profession, despite some of the hardships that come with it.

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